Amendments to the Law on Intellectual Property in the light of the CPTPP

On 12 November 2018, 14th Legislature of the National Assembly of Vietnam approved Resolution No. 72/2018/QH4, ratifying the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans – Pacific Partnership (“CPTPP) and relevant documents in its 6th Session. As stated in Document No.LGL/CPTPPD/2018-15 dated 26 November 2108 of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of New Zealand, the CPTPP became effective with respect to Vietnam as from 14 January 2019.

Following the ratification of the CPTPP, several Vietnam’s legal instruments need to be amended in order to become harmonised and compliant with the provisions and member country’s obligations contained in the CPTPP. The current Law on Intellectual Property of 2005, as amended in 2009 (“IP Law) is not an exception to this, despite the fact that Clause 3 of Article 5 of the IP Law already states that “Where the provisions of the international treaties to which Vietnam is party contravene the provisions of this Law, the former shall be applied”. Similar wordings on priority application of international treaties can be found in other Vietnamese laws, as the express recognition of a principle, but further amendments and legislation are in practice necessary for the purpose of implementing such principle because Vietnamese government agencies may refuse to enforce the provision of an international treaty if such treaty is contrary to Vietnam’s current Constitution 2013 due to a reserved right given by Article 3 of the above-mentioned law. As a dualist state, international treaty obligations generally do not have domestic effect in Vietnam unless embedded into domestic law. Such obligations are embedded into domestic laws through the use of domestic legal instruments (e.g., passing a Law of the National Assembly or through subsidiary legislation via a power granted in a parent legislation).

As required by the CPTPP itself, the assigned authorities therefore prepare the relevant draft legal documents providing guidelines for implementation of such newly-ratified international agreement and submit their drafts to the National Assembly of Vietnam to pass any necessary amendments at its closest session (i.e. at its 7th session in May-June 2019).

Below are some notable amendments to the IP Law relating to different IP subject matters, which are provided for by Law No. 42/2019/QH14 on amendments to some articles of Law on Insurance Business and Law on Intellectual Property, which has been adopted by the National Assembly on 14 June 2019 (“2019 Law amending the IP Law”) and shall come into effect on 1 November 2019, except for certain provisions, which took effect upon 14 January 2019.

Trademark

The current IP Law stipulates in Clause 2 of Article 148 that “a contract for use of an industrial property object shall be effective as agreed by the parties, but shall only be effective towards a third party upon registration with the state administration authority of industrial property rights”. This means that, in practice, the use by the licensee of an IP subject in an unregistered contract may be ignored by the relevant authorities for subsequent transactions such as royalty payment, remittance of royalty overseas or termination of trademark for non-use during five consecutive years.

Clause 27 of Article 18 of the CPTPP seems now to remove this problem, by expressly providing for that no member country can require the recordal of a trademark licence in order to establish the validity of such licence. For other objects of industrial property, such as patented inventions or industrial designs, the respective provisions of Clause 2 of Article 148 of the current IP Law remain unchanged.

To comply with Clause 27 of Article 18 of CPTPP, two Articles of the IP Law, namely Articles 136 and 148, are amended as follows:

  • Clause 2 of Article 136 is amended to become: “2. The owner of a trademark shall be obliged to use it continuously. The use by a licensee according to a trademark licence contract is deemed to constitute use by the holder. In case the trademark has not been used for a continuous period of 5 years or more, the validity of the trademark registration certificate shall be terminated in accordance with Article 95 of this Law”.

  • Clauses 2 and 3 of Article 148 are also amended as follows:

2. For the industrial property rights established on the basis of the registration as referred to in Article 6.3.(a) of this Law, a contract for the use of an industrial property object shall be effective as agreed by the parties.”

3. A contract for the use of an industrial property object provided for in Clause 2 of this Article shall only be effective towards a third party upon registration with the state administration authority of industrial property rights, except for trademark licence contracts.

Inventions

The current IP Law stipulates in Clause 3 of Article 60 a grace period of 6 months to preserve the novelty of an invention against its disclosure by the applicant in certain circumstances (such as disclosure in the form of a scientific presentation or at a national exhibition of Vietnam or at an official or officially recognised international exhibition), or its disclosure by a third party without permission of the applicant. Accordingly, all the above disclosed information shall not be taken into consideration for the examination of the novelty of an invention to be patented.

However, Clause 38 of Article 18 of the CPTPP requires the grace period to be extended to 12 months (instead of 6 months) against disclosure by the applicant or by a third party having obtained the information directly or indirectly from the applicant, for examination of both novelty and inventive step of the invention to be patented.

To comply with the above requirement under the CPTPP, Clause 3 of Article 60 of the current IP Law (providing for determination of novelty) is amended as follows:

3. An invention shall not be considered as lacking novelty if it was publicly disclosed by the person entitled to register it as provided in Article 86 of this Law (the Applicant), or by a person having obtained information about the invention directly or indirectly from the Applicant, provided that the invention registration application is filed within 12 months from the date of disclosure”.

A new Clause 4 is added to Article 60 as follows:

4. Provisions in Clause 3 of this Article shall also apply to any invention disclosed in applications for registration of intellectual property rights or in intellectual property protection titles which have been published by the authority in charge of intellectual property in cases where such publication is inconsistent with the provisions of laws or the application was  filed by a person ineligible for registration.

For full compliance with Clause 38 of Article 18 of the CPTPP, Article 61 of the current IP Law (determining level of invention) is also to be amended by the way of classifying inventions and technical solutions with the addition of a new Clause 2, which defines:

“2. Technical solution which is an invention disclosed in accordance with Clauses 3 and 4 of Article 60 of this Law, which must not be used as a basis for evaluation of the level of invention.”.

Geographical Indications (“GI”)

Clause 32 of Article 18 of the CPTPP provides the grounds for opposition/ cancellation of GI based on: (i) likelihood of its confusion with a registered/protected trademark or with a trademark in a pending application(ii) when the name of the GI is a term customarily used in common language to identify the relevant goods.

Clause 33 of this Article of the CPTPP imposes a member country’s obligation with respect to the procedures in determining whether a term is the term customary in common language as the common name for the relevant good in the territory of that member country, its authorities shall have the authority to take into account how consumers understand the term in the territory of that member country. Factors relevant to such consumer understanding may include: (i) whether the term is used to refer to the type of good in question, as indicated by competent sources such as dictionaries, newspapers and relevant websites; and (ii) how the good referenced by the term is marketed and used in trade in the territory of that member country.

And Clause 36 of the same Article 18 of the CPTPP regulates the recognition and protection of GI according to international agreements.

Thus, two Articles of the IP Law are amended in order to comply with the requirements of the CPTPP with respect to GI:

  •  

  • In Article 80, which lists out the objects that are ineligible for protection as geographical indications, Clauses 1 and 3 are amended as follows:

– Clause 1 of Article 80 is amended to become: “1. Designations, indications having become common names of goods widely accepted by the relevant consumers in Vietnam.”.

– Clause 3 of Article 80 is amended to become: “3. GI identical with or similar to a trademark having been protected or being submitted under a trademark application with early or privileged submitting date if the use of such GI will be capable to cause confusion as to the commercial origin of the goods.”.

  • A new Article 120a is also added as follows:

120a. International proposals and processing of international proposals on geographical indications

1. Proposals for recognition and protection of geographical indications in accordance with international agreement to which the Socialist Republic of Vietnam is negotiating, are called international proposals.

2. The announcement of international proposals and handling of third-party opinions, assessment of conditions for protection of geographical indications in international proposals shall comply with the equivalent provisions specified in this Law for geographical indications in geographical indication applications submitted to industrial property rights authority.”.

Online Filing

According to Clause 24 of Article 18 of the CPTPP on the “Electronic Trademarks System”, each member country must provide: (i) a system for the electronic application for, and maintenance of, trademarks; and (ii) a publicly available electronic information system, including an online database, of trademark applications and of registered trademarks.

Although the CPTPP requires an electronic system for trademarks only, a new Clause 3 is added to Article 89 of the current IP Law to include applications for establishment of all kinds of industrial property rights, as follows:

3. Applications for establishment of industrial property rights may be filed in paper form or in electronic form.”.

Enforcement

In accordance with the requirements in Sub-clause 15, Clause 74 of Article 18 of the CPTPP on measures against abuse of enforcement proceedings with regard to intellectual property rights, including trademarks, geographical indications, patents, copyright and related rights and industrial designs so that a party is provided with wrongfully enjoined or restrained adequate compensation for the injury suffered; Article 198 of the IP Law is supplemented with the two new following Clauses:

“4. If the court concludes that there is no infringement of intellectual property, the defendant, being an organisation or individual, is entitled to request the court to order the plaintiff to reimburse for their reasonable expenses such as attorney’s fees or other expenses in accordance with laws.

5. An organisation or individual suffering damages caused by other organisation or individual abusing the enforcement procedures with regard to intellectual property rights shall have the right to request the court to order the abuser to compensate for the damages caused by the abuse, which may include reasonable attorney’s fees. Acts of abusing the enforcement procedures with regard to intellectual property rights include acts of intentionally exceeding the scope or objective of this procedure.

For enforcement of IP rights, Clause 1 of Article 205 of the current IP Law is also amended by adding a new item (c), which now allows to consider also “c) Other  material damages calculated by the intellectual property rights holder in accordance with provisions of laws.” as an element for determining the amount of damages caused by an infringement of intellectual property rights (for compliance with Sub-clause 4, Clause 74 of Article 18 of the CPTPP, in general form).

Customs Measures

Sub-clause 4, Clause 76 of Article 18 of the CPTPP requires the relevant authority of a member country to provide, at least with respect to imported goods, certain information of the goods to the right holder, normally within 30 working days of the seizure or determination that the goods are counterfeit trademark goods or pirated copyright goods.

To comply with the above requirement, Clause 1 of Article 218 of the IP Law is amended by adding a new sentence at the end of this Clause as follows:

“1. When a person who requests for the suspension of customs procedures has properly performed his or her obligations provided for in Article 217 of this Law, the customs office shall issue the decision on suspension of customs procedures with regard to the relevant lots of goods. Within  a period of 30 days of the date of issuance of the decision on application of administrative measures to handle trademark counterfeiting and smuggled goods specified in Clause 4, Article 216 of this Law, the customs office shall provide the intellectual property rights holder with information on the names and addresses of the consignor, exporter, consignee or importer; a description of the goods; the quantity of the goods; and, if known, the country of origin of the goods.

Despite this change, the time period of 30 days for the customs office to provide the intellectual property rights (“IPRs”) holder with certain information seems still too long if compared with the time-limit of only 10 working days (or maximum 20 working days in case of extension) prescribed in Clause 2 of Article 218, within which the IPRs holder must initiate legal proceedings against suspected infringers. The IPRs holder needs within the time limit of 10 working days (not 30 days) the information from the customs office in order to decide whether to initiate legal proceedings or not.

The 2019 Law amending the IP Law include also transitional provisions which take into account the effectiveness of the CPTPP in Vietnam since 14 January 2019, namely:

  • The applications for registration of inventions/geographic indications filed prior to 14 January 2019 shall be processed according to the provisions of the current IP Law;
  • The trademark licence contracts executed by the parties but not registered with the State authority in charge of industrial property prior to 14 January 2019 shall be effective with respect to a third party only as from 14 January 2019; and
  • Lawsuits against infringements of IPRs that have been accepted by competent authorities prior to 14 January 2019 but have not been settled yet, shall continue to apply the provisions of the current IP Law.

In addition to the above-mentioned amendments, further amendments to the current IP Law may be required in order to implement other obligations of member country according to the CPTPP (such as with respect to the Protection of Sound Marks, Protection of Undisclosed Test or Other Data for Agricultural Chemical Products, Protection of Undisclosed Test or Other Data, among others), which will become effective within 3 to 10 years from the ratification of the CPTPP. Moreover, for full compliance with the CPTPP, Vietnam will also need to ratify the Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purposes of Patent Procedure; the WIPO Copyright Treaty (WCT) and the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT)

Ngày 12 tháng 11 năm 2018, Khóa 14 của Quốc hội đã phê chuẩn Nghị quyết số 72/2018/QH4, phê chuẩn Hiệp định về Quan hệ Đối tác Toàn diện và Tiến bộ Xuyên Thái Bình Dương (“CPTPP”) và các tài liệu liên quan tại Kỳ họp thứ 6. Như đã nêu trong Văn bản số LGL/CPTPPD/2018-15 ngày 26 tháng 11 năm 2108 của Bộ Ngoại giao Niu Di-lân, Hiệp định CPTPP có hiệu lực đối với Việt Nam kể từ ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019.

Sau khi Hiệp định CPTPP được phê chuẩn, nhiều văn bản pháp luật của Việt Nam cần phải được sửa đổi để trở nên hài hòa và tuân thủ các quy định và nghĩa vụ của quốc gia thành viên trong Hiệp định CPTPP. Yêu cầu này cũng được đặt ra đối với Luật Sở hữu Trí tuệ hiện hành năm 2005, được sửa đổi năm 2009 (“Luật SHTT”), mặc dù thực tế là Khoản 3 Điều 5 của Luật SHTT đã quy định rằng “Trong trường hợp điều ước quốc tế mà Cộng hoà xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam là thành viên có quy định khác với quy định của Luật này thì áp dụng quy định của điều ước quốc tế đó”. Các quy định tương tự về việc áp dụng các điều ước quốc tế có thể được tìm thấy trong các luật khác của Việt Nam, như sự thừa nhận rõ ràng của một nguyên tắc, nhưng việc sửa đổi và ban hành các văn bản pháp luật mới trong thực tế là cần thiết cho mục đích thực hiện nguyên tắc đó vì các cơ quan chính phủ Việt Nam có thể từ chối thực thi điều khoản của một điều ước quốc tế nếu điều ước đó trái với Hiến pháp hiện hành năm 2013 của Việt Nam do quyền được bảo lưu theo Điều 3 của Hiến pháp nêu trên. Là một quốc gia nhị nguyên, các nghĩa vụ theo điều ước quốc tế nói chung không có hiệu lực trong nước tại Việt Nam trừ khi được đưa vào nội luật. Những nghĩa vụ đó được đưa vào nội luật thông qua việc sử dụng các công cụ pháp lý trong nước (ví dụ: thông qua Luật của Quốc hội hoặc thông qua văn bản dưới luật theo quyền lực được quy định trong luật).

Do đó, theo yêu cầu của chính Hiệp định CPTPP, các cơ quan được giao đã chuẩn bị dự thảo văn bản pháp luật liên quan cung cấp hướng dẫn thực hiện thuận ước quốc tế mới được phê chuẩn này và đệ trình dự thảo của họ lên Quốc hội Việt Nam để thông qua bất kỳ sửa đổi cần thiết nào tại phiên họp gần nhất của Quốc hội (tức là tại Kỳ họp thứ 7 diễn ra vào tháng 5 tháng 6 năm 2019).

Dưới đây là một số sửa đổi đáng chú ý đối với Luật SHTT liên quan đến các vấn đề sở hữu trí tuệ khác nhau, được Luật số 42/2019/QH14 về sửa đổi một số điều của Luật Kinh doanh Bảo hiểm và Luật Sở hữu Trí tuệ, đã được Quốc hội thông qua vào ngày 14 tháng 6 năm 2019 (“Luật 2019 sửa đổi Luật SHTT”), ban hành và sẽ có hiệu lực vào ngày 1 tháng 11 năm 2019, ngoại trừ một số quy định có hiệu lực vào ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019.

Nhãn hiệu

Luật SHTT hiện hành tại Khoản 2 Điều 148 quy định “hợp đồng sử dụng đối tượng sở hữu công nghiệp có hiệu lực theo thỏa thuận giữa các bên, nhưng chỉ có giá trị pháp lý đối với bên thứ ba khi đã được đăng ký tại cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về quyền sở hữu công nghiệp”. Điều này có nghĩa là, trên thực tế, việc người được cấp phép sử dụng đối tượng sở hữu công nghiệp trong hợp đồng chưa đăng ký có thể bị các cơ quan có liên quan bỏ qua cho các giao dịch tiếp theo như thanh toán tiền bản quyền, chuyển tiền bản quyền ra nước ngoài hoặc chấm dứt nhãn hiệu không được sử dụng trong năm năm liên tiếp.

Khoản 27 Điều 18 Hiệp định CPTPP dường như đã loại bỏ vấn đề này, bằng cách quy định rõ ràng rằng không một quốc gia thành viên nào có thể yêu cầu đăng ký cấp phép sử dụng nhãn hiệu để thiết lập hiệu lực của việc cấp phép đó. Đối với các đối tượng sở hữu công nghiệp khác, như phát minh được cấp bằng sáng chế hoặc kiểu dáng công nghiệp, các quy định tương ứng tại Khoản 2 Điều 148 của Luật SHTT hiện hành không có gì thay đổi.

Để tuân thủ Khoản 27 Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP, hai Điều 136 và 148 của Luật SHTT đã được sửa đổi. Cụ thể là:

  • Khoản 2 Điều 136 được sửa đổi như sau:

2.       Chủ sở hữu nhãn hiệu có nghĩa vụ sử dụng liên tục nhãn hiệu. Việc sử dụng nhãn hiệu bởi bên nhận chuyển quyền theo hợp đồng sử dụng nhãn hiệu cũng được coi là hành vi sử dụng nhãn hiệu của chủ sở hữu nhãn hiệu. Trong trường hợp nhãn hiệu không được sử dụng liên tục từ năm năm trở lên thì Giấy chứng nhận đăng ký nhãn hiệu đó bị chấm dứt hiệu lực theo quy định tại Điều 95 của Luật này.”.

  • Các Khoản 2 và 3 Điều 148 được sửa đổi như sau:

2.       Đối với các loại quyền sở hữu công nghiệp được xác lập trên cơ sở đăng ký theo quy định tại điểm a khoản 3 Điều 6 của Luật này, hợp đồng sử dụng đối tượng sở hữu công nghiệp có hiệu lực theo thỏa thuận giữa các bên.”

3.       Hợp đồng sử dụng đối tượng sở hữu công nghiệp tại khoản 2 Điều này, trừ hợp đồng sử dụng nhãn hiệu, phải đăng ký tại cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về quyn sở hữu công nghiệp mới có giá trị pháp lý đối với bên thứ ba.

Sáng chế

Luật SHTT hiện hành quy định tại Khoản 3 Điều 60 thời gian ân hạn 6 tháng để bảo vệ tính mới của sáng chế chống lại sự tiết lộ của người nộp đơn trong một số trường hợp (như tiết lộ dưới hình thức trình bày khoa học hoặc tại triển lãm quốc gia ở Việt Nam hoặc tại một triển lãm quốc tế chính thức hoặc được công nhận chính thức), hoặc tiết lộ bởi bên thứ ba mà không có sự cho phép ủa người nộp đơn. Theo đó, tất cả các thông tin được tiết lộ ở trên sẽ không được xem xét để kiểm tra tính mới của sáng chế được cấp bằng sáng chế.

Tuy nhiên, Khoản 38 Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP yêu cầu thời gian ân hạn được kéo dài đến 12 tháng (thay vì 6 tháng) đối với việc người nộp đơn hoặc bên thứ ba có được thông tin trực tiếp hoặc gián tiếp từ người nộp đơn để kiểm tra trong các bước về tính mới và sáng tạo của sáng chế được cấp bằng sáng chế.

Để tuân thủ các yêu cầu trên theo Hiệp định CPTPP, Khoản 3 Điều 60 của Luật SHTT hiện hành (quy định về xác định tính mới) được sửa đổi như sau:

3.       Sáng chế không bị coi là mất tính mới nếu được người có quyền đăng ký quy định tại Điều 86 của Luật này hoặc người có được thông tin về sáng chế một cách trực tiếp hoặc gián tiếp từ người đó bộc lộ công khai với điều kiện đơn đăng ký sáng chế được nộp tại Việt Nam trong thời hạn mười hai tháng kể từ ngày bộc lộ.”.

Khoản 4 như sau được bổ sung vào Điều 60:

“4.       Quy định tại Khoản 3 Điều này cũng áp dụng đối với sáng chế được bộc lộ trong đơn đăng ký sở hữu công nghiệp hoặc văn bằng bảo hộ sở hữu công nghiệp do cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về sở hữu công nghiệp công bố trong trường hợp việc công bố không phù hợp với quy định của pháp luật hoặc đơn do người không có quyền đăng ký nộp.

Để tuân thủ đầy đủ Khoản 38 Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP, Điều 61 của Luật SHTT hiện hành (xác định trình độ sáng tạo của sáng chế) cũng được sửa đổi bằng cách phân loại sáng chế và giải pháp kỹ thuật với việc bổ sung Khoản 2 mới, trong đó định nghĩa:

“2.       Giải pháp kỹ thuật là sáng chế được bộc lộ theo quy định tại Khoản 3 và Khoản 4 Điều 60 của Luật này không được lấy làm cơ sở để đánh giá trình độ sáng tạo của sáng chế đó.”.

Chỉ dẫn địa lý

Khoản 32 Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP cung cấp các căn cứ để phản đối/ hủy bỏ chỉ dẫn địa lý dựa trên: (i) khả năng nhầm lẫn của nó với nhãn hiệu đã đăng ký/ được bảo hộ hoặc với nhãn hiệu trong đơn đăng ký đang chờ xử lý; (ii) khi tên của chỉ dẫn địa lý là một thuật ngữ thường được sử dụng trong ngôn ngữ chung để xác định hàng hóa có liên quan.

Khoản 33 Điều này của Hiệp định CPTPP ấn định nghĩa vụ của một quốc gia thành viên đối với các thủ tục trong việc xác định liệu một thuật ngữ có phải là thuật ngữ thông thường trong ngôn ngữ chung như là tên chung cho hàng hóa có liên quan trong lãnh thổ của quốc gia thành viên đó hay không, các cơ quan có thẩm quyền xem xét cách người tiêu dùng hiểu thuật ngữ trong lãnh thổ của quốc gia thành viên đó. Các yếu tố liên quan đến sự hiểu biết của người tiêu dùng như vậy có thể bao gồm: (i) liệu thuật ngữ này có được sử dụng để chỉ loại hàng hóa được đề cập hay không, như được chỉ ra bởi các nguồn có thẩm quyền như từ điển, báo và các trang thông tin điện tử có liên quan; và (ii) làm thế nào hàng hóa được dẫn chiếu bởi thuật ngữ này được bán và sử dụng trong thương mại trên lãnh thổ của quốc gia thành viên đó.

Và Khoản 36 của cùng Điều 18 Hiệp định CPTPP quy định việc công nhận và bảo vệ chỉ dẫn địa lý theo các thỏa ước quốc tế.

Do đó, hai Điều của Luật SHTT được sửa đổi để tuân thủ các yêu cầu của Hiệp định CPTPP đối với chỉ dẫn địa lý:

* Trong Điều 80 liệt kê các đối tượng không đủ điều kiện để bảo vệ như chỉ dẫn địa lý, các Khoản 1 và Khoản 3 được sửa đổi như sau:

  • Theo Khoản 1 Điều 80 được sửa đổi:

1.       Tên gọi, chỉ dẫn đã trở thành tên gọi chung của hàng hóa theo nhận thức của người tiêu dùng có liên quan trên lãnh thổ Việt Nam.”.

  • Theo Khoản 3 Điều 80 được sửa đổi:

3.       Chỉ dẫn địa lý trùng hoặc tương tự với một nhãn hiệu đang được bảo hộ hoặc đã được nộp theo đơn đăng ký nhãn hiệu có ngày nộp đơn hoặc ngày ưu tiên sớm hơn, nếu việc sử dụng chỉ dẫn địa lý đó được thực hiện thì có khả năng gây nhầm lẫn về nguồn gốc thương mại của hàng hóa.”.

* Điều 120a mới được bổ sung quy định:

120a. Đề nghị quốc tế và xử lý đề nghị quốc tế về chỉ dẫn địa lý

1.         Đề nghị công nhận và bảo hộ chỉ dẫn địa lý theo điều ước quốc tế mà Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam đang đàm phán gọi là đề nghị quốc tế.

2.         Việc công bố đề nghị quốc tế, xử lý ý kiến của người thứ ba, đánh giá điều kiện bảo hộ đối với chỉ dẫn địa lý trong đề nghị quốc tế được thực hiện theo các quy định tương ứng tại Luật này đối với chỉ dẫn địa lý trong đơn đăng ký chỉ dẫn địa lý được nộp cho cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về quyền sở hữu công nghiệp.”.

Nộp hồ sơ trực tuyến

Theo Khoản 24 Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP về “Hệ thống nhãn hiệu điện tử”, mỗi quốc gia thành viên phải cung cấp: (i) một hệ thống cho đơn xin đăng ký điện tử và duy trì nhãn hiệu; và (ii) một hệ thống thông tin điện tử có sẵn công khai, bao gồm cơ sở dữ liệu trực tuyến, về các đơn xin đăng ký nhãn hiệu và nhãn hiệu đã đăng ký.

Mặc dù Hiệp định CPTPP chỉ yêu cầu một hệ thống điện tử cho các nhãn hiệu, Khoản 3 mới được bổ sung vào Điều 89 của Luật SHTT hiện hành bao gồm cả các đơn đăng ký xác lập tất cả các loại quyền sở hữu công nghiệp, như sau:

3.       Đơn đăng ký xác lập quyền sở hữu công nghiệp được nộp dưới hình thức văn bản ở dạng giấy cho cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về quyền sở hữu công nghiệp hoặc dạng điện tử theo hệ thống nộp đơn trực tuyến.”.

Thực thi pháp luật

Theo các yêu cầu tại Mục 15, Khoản 74, Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP về các biện pháp chống lạm dụng thủ tục tố tụng thực thi pháp luật liên quan đến quyền sở hữu trí tuệ, bao gồm nhãn hiệu, chỉ dẫn địa lý, bằng sáng chế, quyền tác giả và các quyền liên quan và kiểu dáng công nghiệp theo đó một bên nhận được hoặc bị cấm nhận một cách sai trái khoản bồi thường đầy đủ cho thương tích phải gánh chịu; Điều 198 của Luật SHTT được bổ sung hai khoản mới sau đây:

“4.       Tổ chức, cá nhân là bị đơn trong vụ kiện xâm phạm quyền sở hữu trí tuệ, nếu được Tòa án kết luận là không thực hiện hành vi xâm phạm có quyền yêu cầu Tòa án buộc nguyên đơn thanh toán cho mình chi phí hợp lý để thuê luật sư hoặc các chi phí khác theo quy định của pháp luật.

5.         Tổ chức, cá nhân lạm dụng thủ tục bảo vệ quyền sở hữu trí tuệ mà gây thiệt hại cho tổ chức, cá nhân khác thì tổ chức, cá nhân bị thiệt hại có quyền yêu cầu Tòa án buộc bên lạm dụng thủ tục đó phải bồi thường cho những thiệt hại do việc lạm dụng gây ra, trong đó bao gồm chi phí hợp lý để thuê luật sư. Hành vi lạm dụng thủ tục bảo vệ quyền sở hữu trí tuệ bao gồm hành vi cố ý vượt quá phạm vi hoặc mục tiêu của thủ tục này.

Để thực thi quyền sở hữu trí tuệ, Khoản 1 Điều 205 của Luật SHTT hiện hành cũng được sửa đổi bằng cách thêm vào một điểm (c) mới, hiện cho phép xem xét cả “c) Thiệt hại vật chất theo các cách tính khác do chủ thể quyn sở hữu trí tuệ đưa ra phù hợp với quy định của pháp luật.” như là một yếu tố để xác định mức độ thiệt hại do việc xâm phạm quyền sở hữu trí tuệ gây ra (để tuân thủ Điểm 4, Khoản 74, Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP, dưới hình thức chung).

Biện pháp hải quan

Mục 4, Khoản 76, Điều 18 của Hiệp định CPTPP yêu cầu cơ quan có thẩm quyền của một quốc gia thành viên cung cấp, ít nhất là đối với hàng hóa nhập khẩu, một số thông tin nhất định của hàng hóa cho chủ sở hữu quyền sở hữu trí tuệ, thông thường trong vòng 30 ngày làm việc kể từ ngày tịch thu hoặc xác định rằng hàng hóa là hàng giả nhãn hiệu hoặc hàng vi phạm bản quyền.

Để tuân thủ yêu cầu trên, Khoản 1 Điều 218 của Luật SHTT được sửa đổi bằng cách thêm một câu mới vào cuối Khoản này như sau:

“1.       Khi người yêu cầu tạm dừng làm thủ tục hải quan đã thực hiện đầy đủ các nghĩa vụ quy định tại Điều 217 của Luật này thì cơ quan hải quan ra quyết định tạm dừng làm thủ tục hải quan đối với lô hàng. Cơ quan hải quan cung cấp cho chủ thể quyền sở hữu trí tuệ thông tin về tên và địa chỉ của người gửi hàng; nhà xuất khẩu, người nhận hàng hoặc nhà nhập khu; bản mô tả hàng hóa; số lượng hàng hóa; nước xuất xứ của hàng hóa nếu biết, trong thời hạn ba mươi ngày kể từ ngày ra quyết định áp dụng biện pháp hành chính để xử lý đối với hàng hóa giả mạo về nhãn hiệu và hàng hóa sao chép lậu theo quy định tại Khoản 4 Điều 216 của Luật này.

Bất kể sự thay đổi này, khoảng thời gian 30 ngày để cơ quan hải quan cung cấp cho chủ sở hữu quyền sở hữu trí tuệ (quyền SHTT) với một số thông tin nhất định dường như vẫn còn quá dài nếu so với thời hạn chỉ 10 ngày làm việc (hoặc tối đa 20 ngày làm việc ngày trong trường hợp gia hạn) được quy định tại Khoản 2 Điều 218, trong đó chủ sở hữu quyền SHTT phải bắt đầu thủ tục tố tụng về mặt pháp lý đối với những người bị nghi ngờ là xâm phạm quyền SHTT. Trong thời hạn 10 ngày làm việc (chứ không phải 30 ngày), chủ sở hữu quyền SHTT cần thông tin từ cơ quan hải quan để quyết định có nên bắt đầu thủ tục tố tụng về mặt pháp lý hay không.

Luật năm 2019 sửa đổi Luật SHTT còn đưa ra các điều khoản chuyển tiếp có tính đến hiệu lực của Hiệp định CPTPP đối với Việt Nam kể từ ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019, cụ thể là:

  • Đơn đăng ký sáng chế/ chỉ dẫn địa lý được nộp trước ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019 sẽ được xử lý theo các quy định của Luật SHTT hiện hành;

  • Hợp đồng cấp phép sử dụng nhãn hiệu đã được các bên ký kết nhưng chưa được đăng ký với cơ quan quản lý nhà nước về sở hữu công nghiệp trước ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019 sẽ chỉ có hiệu lực đối với bên thứ ba kể từ ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019; và

  • Các vụ kiện chống lại hành vi xâm phạm quyền sở hữu trí tuệ đã được cơ quan có thẩm quyền thụ lý trước ngày 14 tháng 1 năm 2019 nhưng chưa được giải quyết xong, sẽ tiếp tục áp dụng các quy định của Luật SHTT hiện hành để giải quyết.

Ngoài các sửa đổi nêu trên, Luật SHTT hiện hành có thể cần được sửa đổi thêm để thực hiện các nghĩa vụ khác của quốc gia thành viên theo Hiệp định CPTPP (như đối với Bảo vệ Nhãn hiệu Âm thanh, Bảo vệ Thử nghiệm không được tiết lộ hoặc Dữ liệu Khác cho các sản phẩm hóa chất nông nghiệp, Bảo vệ Thử nghiệm không được tiết lộ hoặc Dữ liệu Khác, cùng với các trách nhiệm khác), sẽ có hiệu lực trong vòng 3 đến 10 năm kể từ khi phê chuẩn Hiệp định CPTPP. Hơn nữa, để tuân thủ đầy đủ Hiệp định CPTPP, Việt Nam cũng cần phê chuẩn Hiệp ước Budapest về việc công nhận quốc tế về việc nộp lưu chủng vi sinh nhằm tiến hành các thủ tục về patent; Hiệp ước của WIPO về Quyền tác giả (WCT) và Hiệp ước của WIPO về Cuộc biểu diễn và bản ghi âm (WPPT).